Previous Workshops

Indigenous Interactive Multimedia Program

Many Aboriginal/Inuit professionals and high-school students are not able to attend college or university. These potentially successful Interactive Multimedia artists face obstacles such as incomplete formal academic credentials and or difficulty in attending full-time 2 or 4-year programs. ICMI offers an innovative process that enhances entry-level skills required for acceptance to college or university interactive multimedia design programs. The ICMI program will open pathways for student access to post-secondary education and employment opportunities, as well as offer previously untapped recruitment potential for colleges, universities and employers.
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Video Production Workshop

Our video production workshop introduces video production to aspired Aboriginal videographers, by applying hands-on training with cameras and editing software to successfully display their visions and their stories. Implementing imagination to create a storyboard or script, exploring camera functions, applying camera accessories, digitalizing footage, and exporting the final project, is a portion of what the video production workshop offers. The workshop does not require any prior knowledge of video production, but to effectively achieve intended results the participants are expected to be able to navigate within the applicable operating systems (Windows or Mac).

Media Arts After School Program

Various Aboriginal schools do not offer media arts as a creditable course to their students, but in today's society, media is within every student's everyday life, from facebook to television, and as young individuals it sparks the curiosity of how everything works. The multimedia after school program is designed to introduce youth to the multimedia industry. With a hands-on approach, the program develops an essential skill set for aspired multimedia designers. The program explores the fundamentals of selected applications within the Adobe Creative Suite, which could include Premiere Pro, Photoshop, and Dreamweaver, although programs will vary to successfully fulfill desired training.

Multi Arts and Cultural Camp

The multi arts and cultural camp is designed to pass traditional teachings in an innovative way, while keeping participants active, and expressing creativity through visual/media arts. Some activities that successfully kept the participants learning and having fun, involved creating children specific books from traditional oral teaching, or writing and producing a short film of a revamped local urban legend. The camp develops teamwork skills and confidence with a traditional but modern twist, and included activities such as team regalia making, role specific video production crew, and acting. Camp activities vary from year to year and are available to Aboriginal peoples.



Video Works

Indigenous Culture and Media Innovations partnered with Asinabka Film and Media Festival, and Saw Video, to run a weeklong video production workshop that briefly took the participants through camera operations, lighting, sound recording, and editing. The workshop was designed to document each day of the Asinabka Film and Media Festival, giving the participants hands-on skills with on location shooting and interviewing in a fast paced work environment. Successfully developing three videos and executing multiple interviews, the participants were taught the essentials of video production.

Media Arts Program - Urban Aboriginal Alternate High School

The Urban Aboriginal Alternate High School Program in Ottawa teamed up with Indigenous Culture and Media Innovations to deliver a media arts program that met the curriculum standards and allowed the program to offer what the students wanted to learn. The program ran for four consecutive years, with each year's content changing slightly, but remaining within graphic design, video production, and web design.

Media Arts Program - Kitigan Zibi Kikinamadinan School

Indigenous Culture and Media Innovation's main office is located on Kitigan Zibi Anishinabe soil, and with the surrounding community ICMI put forth motion to offer the students of Kitigan Zibi Kikinamadinan School a media arts program. Kikinamadinan School was very interested in the program and we have successfully implemented a media art program within the school for two consecutive years. The program focused mainly on video production, but also taught the students graphic design and photography. The students have produced multiple films and some have been displayed in the Asinabka Film and Media Festival.